EPA ID# MOD000669069

MoDNR Contact: Haley Neebe, 573-751-3553 or 800-361-4827
Facility Contact: Paul Andrews, 225-778-3645
Last Updated: October 6, 2017

  • Former Company Name: Safety-Kleen Corp.
  • Type of Facility: Permitted Commercial Hazardous Waste Storage.
  • Wastes Handled: Flammables, household hazardous wastes, paint sludges, solvents, and used oil, as well as various F- and K-listed hazardous wastes as specified in the Part A application.
  • Location of hard copies of hazardous waste permit application, Part I and Part II Permits, modification requests, reports, etc. and supporting documents:

Current Activities

Permit Application for Renewal Complete: On March 26, 2017, Safety-Kleen Systems Inc. submitted a permit application to the department and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 to renew the existing hazardous waste permits for its Springfield facility. Safety-Kleen is currently operating at the site under a department-issued Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Facility Part I Permit and EPA-issued Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Part II Permit. These permits allow Safety-Kleen to store hazardous waste in containers and tanks. The status of Safety-Kleen’s corrective action activities is described below.

The department determined the permit application was not complete. Safety-Kleen submitted the requested information, received by the department Aug. 10, 2017. The department determined the permit application was complete and invites the public to review the permit application while the department conducts a technical review of the permit application. The public can review and copy paper copies of the complete permit application and supporting documents at the Springfield-Greene County Library’s The Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expressway, Springfield, Mo. (during normal business hours) or the agency locations above.

 

The Safety-Kleen Systems Inc. Springfield site is located at 734 N. West Bypass in Springfield. Since 1974, Safety-Kleen has operated a commercial hazardous waste storage facility at the site, which originally covered about 1.2 acres. This facility is part of a larger Safety-Kleen distribution/recycling network. The Springfield facility is designed to temporarily store spent solvents, paint wastes, lacquer thinner wastes and waste oil produced by Safety-Kleen customers. The majority of Safety-Kleen’s customers are small quantity hazardous waste generators such as automotive repair, industrial maintenance and dry cleaning businesses. The facility also stores other types of wastes on a 10-day transfer basis. Safety-Kleen is certified to handle most hazardous waste, other than dioxin or polychlorinated biphenyl’s (PCBs) greater than 50 parts per million. Safety-Kleen stores the hazardous waste in containers and tanks until enough waste is collected to ship off-site to a Safety-Kleen recycling facility or contract reclaimer for processing. The reclaimed, or “cleaned”, solvent is then returned to Safety-Kleen’s customers as usable product.

Originally this facility included an office/warehouse building, two 12,000-gallon carbon steel underground storage tanks, a solvent return and fill station with loading dock and two containerized waste storage areas. Spent mineral spirits (solvents) were collected in drums from the customers, transported to the facility, poured into the dumpsters in the return and fill station and pumped into one of the underground storage tank. The second tank was used to hold reclaimed mineral spirits. In 1985, Safety-Kleen began operating a new 15,000-gallon vertical above ground storage tank and return/fill station and stopped using the original underground storage tanks and dumpsters.

One container storage area, located in the warehouse, was originally used for storing spent immersion cleaner and sediment from cleaning the dumpsters in the return and fill station. Chlorinated solvents/cresylic acid blends were collected in drums from the customers, transported to the facility, and stored in the container storage area. In 1984, Safety-Kleen began collecting filter cartridges and still bottoms contaminated with dry cleaning solvents, usually perchloroethylene. These wastes were collected in drums on the customer’s property, transported to the facility and stored in the warehouse container storage area.

In 1986, Safety-Kleen began collecting paint waste from auto body repair businesses. Wastes containing various thinners and paints were collected in drums on the customer’s property, transported to the facility and stored in an enclosed metal Flammable Materials Storage Shelter north of the office/warehouse.

During the early 1990s, Safety-Kleen purchased the property next to the site, increasing the site property to 3.2 acres. Safety-Kleen currently operates one 15,000-gallon vertical above ground storage tank and two hazardous waste container storage areas, the Flammable Materials Storage Shelter and Container Storage Area, with a combined capacity of 5,322 gallons.

According to applicable state and federal hazardous waste laws and regulations, all hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities are required to investigate and clean up releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents to the environment at their facility resulting from present and past hazardous waste handling practices. In May 1990, Ecology and Environment Inc. performed a Environmental Priorities Initiative (EPI) Preliminary Assessment for the site, on behalf of EPA. The assessment, which is equivalent to a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA, Facility Assessment, was conducted to identify and gather information on actual and potential releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents to the environment. The August 1991 Preliminary Assessment Report identified two solid waste management units, which included a discharge receptor area and a retention basin, that were recommended for additional investigation. The discharge receptor area is an area of ground located outside the northeast corner of the secondary containment area around the above ground storage tanks. The retention basin is a natural pond located along the north boundary of the facility that receives water runoff from the northeastern part of the facility. Water collected in the basin either evaporates, seeps through the soil floor of the basin or discharges through an overflow outlet to a ditch on the east side of West Bypass.

In response to the Preliminary Assessment Report, EPA requested Safety-Kleen to perform a focused RCRA Facility Sampling (RFS) to identify any actual releases of hazardous waste or hazardous constituents to the discharge receptor area and retention basin. On behalf of Safety-Kleen, TriHydro Corp. submitted a RCRA Facility Sampling Report to the department and EPA in March 1994. The sampling results indicated that no releases of hazardous wastes or hazardous constituents occurred in the discharge receptor area or retention basin. Based on these results, no further investigation was required for either solid waste management unit.

In August 1990, Safety-Kleen submitted to the department, a partial closure plan for the two 12,000-gallon underground storage tanks and two dumpsters. The department approved Safety-Kleen’s closure plan in August 1991. Safety-Kleen previously emptied and cleaned the tanks in August 1989. Closure of the former underground storage tank area began in October 1991 and included decontaminating and removing the tanks and piping, removing 70 cubic yards of surrounding soil and backfilling the area with clean soil. During the closure, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in soil samples. These results, along with visual observations of the excavated area, suggested possible groundwater impacts at the site. On behalf of Safety-Kleen, Groundwater Technology Inc. conducted additional assessment activities from October 1992 to September 1993, which included a soil gas survey, geophysical survey, soil borings and installing seven monitoring wells. The department accepted Safety-Kleen’s closure report and certification for the underground storage tanks, associated piping, and dumpsters in January 1995. Clean up of the residual contamination was deferred to corrective action.

Safety-Kleen voluntarily conducted interim measures at the site in order to reduce or prevent unacceptable risks to human health and the environment. An interim measure is an action taken to temporarily control the contamination source or path the contamination could take from the source to humans, animals or the environment, such as air, soil, water and food. As an interim measure, Safety-Kleen installed a multi-well groundwater extraction system in May 1995, which discharged to the City of Springfield publicly-owned treatment works. On behalf of Safety-Kleen, Groundwater Technology Inc. submitted a Interim Corrective Measures Report to the department and EPA in October 1995, with addendums in August 1996 and November 1997. Sampling results showed the contaminant concentrations detected in groundwater were below EPA standards for drinking water. The extraction system was shut down in February 1998, but remains in place in case it is needed for cleanup purposes.

At the department’s request, Safety-Kleen performed a Corrective Measures Study to identify and evaluate possible remedial alternatives for the remaining residual soil contamination. On behalf of Safety-Kleen, Fluor Daniel GTI submitted a Corrective Measures Study Report to the department and EPA in April 1998, with a revision submitted in July 1999.

In January 2004, Safety-Kleen conducted an ozone injection pilot study in an attempt to speed up the cleanup process. Ozone was used to remove residual contamination and for hot-spot remediation in areas where VOCs in groundwater were present at or exceeded EPA standards. The initial monitoring results following the pilot test indicated contaminant concentrations in groundwater were reduced below applicable remedial action goals. In June 2005, Trihydro Corp., on behalf of Safety-Kleen, submitted a revised Corrective Measures Study Report to the department and EPA, to reflect current site conditions. The report included Safety-Kleen’s preferred remedy along with other remedial alternatives.

The department, in coordination with EPA, selected the best remedy given site-specific considerations for each solid waste management unit. The department prepared a Statement of Basis that summarized the remedial alternatives and the department’s basis of support for the proposed final remedy. The public was invited to review and comment on the proposed remedy during a 45-day public comment period. In September 2007, the department, in coordination with EPA, approved the proposed final remedy, which included no further corrective action for the subsurface soil, since contaminants levels were below applicable screening levels. The approved final remedy for contaminated groundwater consisted of the interim measures previously completed and monitored natural attenuation. As part of their monitoring program, Safety-Kleen sampled the groundwater once a year for VOCs, naphthalene and chlorinated benzenes. The groundwater monitoring program was used to define the amount of groundwater contamination at the site, the horizontal and vertical extent of the contamination and whether it the contamination was moving, in addition to determining the effectiveness of the approved final remedy. In February 2015, the department approved Safety-Kleen’s Corrective Measures Completion Report, which showed the approved final remedy was complete and groundwater contamination levels were below applicable screening levels. No further active corrective action is required at this time.

Safety-Kleen is currently operating under two hazardous waste permits, one issued by the department and one issued by EPA. The permits were first issued in 1993 and reissued Sept. 27, 2007. The department issued the Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Facility Part I Permit. EPA issued the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Part II Permit. These permits allow Safety-Kleen to store hazardous waste in containers and tanks. The regulated units under the current permits consist of one 15,000-gallon vertical above ground storage tank and two hazardous waste container storage areas, the Flammable Materials Storage Shelter and Container Storage Area. These permits also require corrective action in the event there is a newly-identified release of hazardous waste or hazardous constituents to the environment.

On Feb. 18, 2016, the department issued Part I Class 3 Permit Modifications to Safety-Kleen, removing the active Corrective Action Conditions associated with two underground storage tanks and the related groundwater monitoring and reporting requirements from the Part I Permit. The permit still requires corrective action in the event there is a newly-identified release.

On March 26, 2017, Safety-Kleen submitted a permit application to renew their existing hazardous waste permits, which expired Sept. 27, 2017. Code of State Regulations 10 CSR 25-7.270(1) and Code of Federal Regulations 40 CFR 270.51, allow the existing hazardous waste permits to continue in effect until the department and EPA issue or deny new hazardous waste permits. The department determined the permit application was not complete. Safety-Kleen submitted the requested information, received by the department Aug. 10, 2017. The department determined the permit application was complete and approved the permit application for technical review on Sept. 27, 2017. The department is conducting a technical review of the permit application.