News Release 261

Director Pauley announces more than $2 million for water quality improvements in the southwest region

Volume 39-261 (For Immediate Release)
For more information: 573-751-1010

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JULY 22, 2011 – Sara Parker Pauley, director of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources today announced the awarding of $2,103,759 in grants for three different projects aimed to improve water quality in the southwest region.

Speaking at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Watershed Center at the Valley Water Mill Park in Springfield, Director Pauley announced three Springfield organizations to receive grants to reduce stormwater runoff and improve wastewater treatment systems.


The Watershed Committee of the Ozarks received a $1 million grant to improve water quality in the James and Little Sac rivers by reducing pollution from stormwater runoff. The Missouri Sate University’s Project W.E.T. received a $103,759 grant to provide a statewide series of water quality education workshops aimed at addressing stormwater-related pollution. The Upper White River Basin Foundation received a $1 million grant to improve onsite residential wastewater treatment systems in the Table Rock Lake watershed.


“Urban stormwater runoff is a considerable source of water pollution, not only in Southwest Missouri, but throughout the state and nation,” Pauley said. “The department is honored to be part of these projects and is thrilled of the proactive measures these organizations continue to take to help protect and improve water quality in their communities.”

These projects foster Governor Nixon’s vision of using green innovative technology to improve the environment, help create jobs and stimulate Missouri’s economy. The three organizations that were recently approved to receive the funding include:

* Watershed Committee of the Ozarks - grant to develop the Springfield/Greene County Urban Watershed Stewardship Project. The purpose of this project is to reduce the amount of pollutants flowing into the James River and Little Sac River by targeting four urban subwatersheds to implement best management practices that reduce pollution from stormwater runoff. This project will monitor the performance of the selected practices, estimate pollutant loading changes and determine if the quality of water has improved as a result of the best management practices. The committee will apply the lessons learned from this project to all urban and urbanizing watersheds in the Springfield metropolitan area, which is projected to extend to more than 90 square miles by 2020. The Watershed Committee of the Ozarks will provide a match contribution bringing the total cost to $1.68 million. The committee expects to complete the project by April 2015. Partners in this collaborative effort include the city of Springfield; Greene County; Missouri State University; James River Basin Partnership; Missouri Project WET; Ozark Greenways and volunteer citizens.

* Missouri State University’s Project W.E.T. - grant for a statewide series of water quality education workshops aimed at addressing stormwater-related pollution provided to 13 Missouri communities. Project W.E.T., or Water Education for Teachers, is a statewide program to ensure a consistent, well-established method of water quality related education. Workshops will be held around the state focusing mostly on the watersheds that drain into impaired waterbodies. Missouri State University will provide a matching contribution bringing the total cost to $172,935. The university expects to complete the project by Dec. 2014. Partners in this collaborative effort include National Project W.E.T.; Missouri Department of Conservation; University of Missouri-Extension Service; Missouri Stream Team Watershed Coalition; Missouri Department of Natural Resources; Watershed Committee of the Ozark; and many volunteer facilitators.

* Upper White River Basin Foundation - grant to create a local revolving loan and grant fund that will provide financial assistance to residents needing to repair or replace failing onsite wastewater treatment systems in the Table Rock Lake watershed. The program assistance is estimated to cost $1.14 million and is expected to be completed in July 2015.


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 7 has provided partial funding for the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks and the Missouri State University projects under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. Funding for the Upper White River Basin Foundation comes from Missouri Clean Water State Revolving Fund. The SRF fund provides significant funding to assist communities with infrastructure needs for wastewater. The Department of Natural Resources’ Water Protection Program will administer these grant funds.

The department is committed to working closely with communities and businesses to assist with funding efforts that improve water quality in Missouri as well as provide a financial savings.

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