PUMP AND HAUL OPERATING PERMIT

Water Protection Program fact sheet
07/2016
Division of Environmental Quality Director: Leanne Tippett Mosby
PUB02658

Introduction
The Department of Natural Resources recognizes there are some circumstances where the use of onsite wastewater collection and treatment facilities are not feasible or efficient and for those cases a pump and haul permitting approach may be an alternative.  There are a number of environmental and public health risks associated with the pumping and hauling of domestic and industrial waste, which include; the overflow of storage structures causing an illegal discharge; the accidental loss of wastewater prior to delivery to a permitted facility; illegal dumping of the wastewater; etc.  It is for these reasons the department strongly encourages the use of an onsite wastewater collection and treatment system and that the pumping and hauling of wastewater is only considered after all other options have been exhausted.

The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide a general discussion regarding the department’s Pump and Haul operating permit.  This fact sheet is not intended to address specific design criteria nor is it meant to answer all of the “what if” questions.  If you have any questions concerning the Pump and Haul operating permit please contact the department.

This fact sheet is not applicable to facilities that fall under the jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Senior Services, Onsite Wastewater Treatment Program or the local onsite wastewater authority (commonly the local health department).  The Department of Natural Resources recommends reviewing the fact sheet, Who Regulates Domestic Wastewater in Missouri? - PUB1296, for guidance in determining jurisdictional responsibility.

Domestic wastewater (sewage) is defined in RSMo 701.025(12) Definitions as “sewage” or “domestic sewage”, “Human excreta and wastewater, including bath and toilet waste, residential laundry waste, residential kitchen waste and other similar waste from household or establishment appurtenances.”  For the purpose of this fact sheet, industrial wastewater is any wastewater not defined as domestic wastewater and is the department’s jurisdiction regardless of design flow.

What is the Pump and Haul Operating Permit?
The Pump and Haul operating permit template is for site specific permits for owned domestic and industrial wastewater and includes a number of conditions to ensure facilities are properly operated and maintained.  The permit template can be revised to address issues that arise over time.

Domestic wastewater facilities that require a Pump and Haul operating permit shall submit Form B: Application for Operating Permit for Facilities that Receive Primarily Domestic Waste and Have A Design Flow Less Than Or Equal to 100,000 Gallons Per Day, Form -- MO 780-1512 and are subject to fees identified in 10 CSR 20-6.011(2)(B).

Industrial wastewater facilities that require a Pump and Haul operating permit shall submit Form A: Application For Nondomestic Permit Under Missouri Clean Water Law, Form – MO 780-1479 and are subject to fees identified in 10 CSR 20-6.011(2)(E).

No discharge facility fees are based on the design flow of the wastewater being handled, in accordance with 10 CSR 20-6.011 – Fees.  To determine the appropriate permit fee for your facility the Department suggests reviewing the fact sheet, Wastewater Treatment Facility Permit Fees - PUB2565.

General Requirements of the Pump and Haul Operating Permit
The Pump and Haul operating permit requires all holding tanks and lagoons to have proper alarms, telemetry and the submittal of wastewater hauling records (in gallons) on a quarterly basis to the Department.  As stated above, this operating permit can be modified over time to address issues as they arise.

In accordance with RSMo 644.051, construction permits will not be required for activities that are covered by the template/operating permit unless they involve the construction of earthen basins (lagoons).  Regardless of the need to obtain a construction permit, all holding structures shall be designed and certified by a professional engineer.

However the domestic or industrial wastewater is contained, it must be handled in such a manner that there is no violation of the Missouri Clean Water Law or its regulations.

Approximate Cost
The approximate costs associated with the operation of a pump and haul facility can vary greatly throughout the state and is dependent upon numerous factors, which include; pumping frequency, accessibility, travel time and the method of final treatment.  In 2015 the approximate cost to pump and treat 3,500 gallons of domestic wastewater ranged from $450.00 to above $800.00 depending upon where the facility was located.  If a facility requires monthly pumping, the cost can reach up to $10,000.00 per year.

Calculating the estimated cost of pumping the facility for its expected life should be part of the initial planning and not an afterthought, as the cost of a treatment system may be less expensive than a pump and haul system over time.

DOMESTIC WASTEWATER

No-Discharge Lagoons
Given the previously identified risk and the department’s regulatory authority to permit otherwise exempt facilities, as of January 12, 2015, all owners of new no-discharge lagoons that receive 3,000 gallons per day or less of domestic wastewater and pump and haul their waste are required to obtain construction and operating permits.  Existing 3,000 gallons per day or less no-discharge lagoons shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

All 3,000 gallons per day or less no-discharge domestic wastewater lagoons followed by surface land application that are operated as such, may be considered exempt by rule, unless it is determined by the department that the operating practices are not adequate and that an operating permit is necessary to protect public health and the environment.  A copy of the design guidance is available on the Missouri Secretary of State’s website.

Construction and operating permits from the department shall be required when the accumulated maximum daily flows of domestic wastewater for a facility under the same common promotional plan or operating location are greater than 3,000 gallons per day on any day within a given calendar year.

A single-family lagoon serving an individual residence on an individual lot is the jurisdictional responsibility of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Onsite Wastewater Treatment Program or the local onsite wastewater authority and does not qualify for the no-discharge lagoon exemption or the Pump and Haul operating permit.

Holding Tanks
Any holding tank that receives greater than 3,000 gallons per day of domestic wastewater is required to obtain a Pump and Haul operating permit.

A Pump and Haul operating permit shall also be required when the accumulated maximum daily design flows of domestic wastewater for all holding tanks for a facility under the same common promotional plan or operating location is greater than 3,000 gallons per day.  This is regardless if each holding tank receives less than 3,000 gallons per day.

Regardless of the requirement for a construction permit all holding tanks shall be designed and certified by a registered engineer.

All above and below ground holding tanks that receive 3,000 gallons per day or less of domestic waste only are the jurisdictional responsibility of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Onsite Wastewater Treatment Program or the local onsite wastewater administrative authority.

INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

10 CSR 20-6.015 (3)(B)12 states “An operating permit is not required for process waste holding structures from which the contents are hauled to a permitted treatment or disposal facility, if the owner has a written contract with the hauler and approval from the receiving facility.”

If the owner is unable or cannot provide the appropriate documentation demonstrating their facility is exempt then they must obtain a Pump and Haul operating permit for industrial wastewater. An operating permit may also be required if it is determined by the department the operating practices are not adequate to protect public health and the environment.

As with domestic wastewater, regardless of the requirements for a construction permit all holding tanks that receive industrial wastewater shall be design and certified by a registered engineer.

Construction and operating permits shall be required for all no-discharge lagoons receiving any amount of industrial waste.

Summary
The Department of Natural Resources recognizes there are some circumstances where the use of onsite wastewater collection and treatment facilities are not feasible or efficient, and, for those cases a pump and haul operating permit may be an alternative. However, it is strongly recommended that this option only be considered after all others have been exhausted.