Address: 4018 Harvard Lane
Kansas City, MO 64133
County: Jackson   
Date of establishment: July 1, 2013.
Pollutants monitored: fine particulate matter (PM2.5); carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen dioxide (NO2); and black carbon (BC)
Site coordinates
* Latitude: 39.047911°
* Longitude: -94.450513°
EPA Site ID: 29-095-0042

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources selected this spot for a near-road air monitor in Kansas City after analyzing traffic-related data and evaluating locations that met EPA's criteria for air monitoring sites. These criteria stipulate that monitors must be appropriate distances from trees, buildings and minor sources of pollutants, among other conditions. The Blue Ridge air monitoring station is adjacent to Interstate 70, and it is near an apartment complex and across the highway from Blue Ridge Crossing, a shopping center.

The department established the site in accordance with two federal rules that required near-road monitoring in the Kansas City area: the 2010 rule revising the NO2 standard and the 2011 rule continuing the CO standard. To read about the site selection, go to page 32 of the department's 2012 Monitoring Network Plan. Near-road monitors provide information on emissions from motor vehicles. St. Louis has two near-road monitors: Forest Park and Rider Trail.

In addition to monitoring three criteria pollutants, the site monitors for black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter. The department also monitors black carbon at its other near-road sites. The measurements are useful in identifying the effects of emissions from motor vehicles.

Fine particulate matter describes inhalable particles with diameters 2.5 micrometers and smaller. They are only visible with an electron microscope. They come from all types of combustion, such as motor vehicles, power plants, fires and some industrial processes. They are so small that they can become entrenched in one's lungs, causing health problems.

EPA uses two ways to determine compliance with PM2.5 federal standards. One looks at data over a 24-hour period,
and the other takes into account data from a whole year.

In December 2012, EPA made the annual PM2.5 standard more stringent, setting it at 12 micrograms
per cubic meter, based on the three-year average of annual means. At that same time, EPA
retained the 24-hour PM2.5 standard of 35 micrograms per cubic meter, based
on the 98th percentile of 24-hour measurements, averaged over three years.

Weekly summary of preliminary data from all PM2.5 sites

Preliminary up-to-date one-hour averages from Blue Ridge, I-70
• PM2.5 data in eighth column of second page. Each day has three pages of data.
• Data from past 10 days through current date
• Central Standard Time

Preliminary up-to-date one-hour averages from all PM2.5 sites
• Data from past three days through current date
• Central Standard Time

Graph of PM2.5 annual design values from Kansas City sites, beginning in 2003

Graph of PM2.5 24-hour design values from Kansas City sites, beginning in 2003

Department webpage about fine particulate matter

*Technical issues can affect ability to deliver quality data.
Click to access a table of symbols indicating issues.

Carbon monoxide has no color, taste or odor. It comes from the incomplete combustion of fuels with carbon, such as oil, coal, wood, gasoline and natural gas. Vehicle emissions account for the largest source. Breathing air with high concentrations of CO can result in multiple health effects.

Since 1971, EPA has maintained two standards for carbon monoxide. The eight-hour
standard stands at 9 parts per million, and the one-hour standard stands at 35 parts per million.
If design values are at or below the standard, then an area is in compliance. Design values
correspond to an annual average of eight-hour concentrations and one-hour concentrations.

Summary of preliminary data from CO sites

Preliminary up-to-date one-hour averages of CO from Blue Ridge, I-70
• CO data in sixth column of first page. Each day has three pages of data.
• Data from past 10 days through current date.
• Central Standard Time

Preliminary up-to-date one-hour averages from all CO sites
• Data from three days ago through current date
• Central Standard Time

Graph of CO one-hour design values for all sites, beginning in 2003

Graph of CO eight-hour design values for all sites, beginning in 2003

*Technical issues can affect ability to deliver quality data.
Click to access a table of symbols indicating issues.

Nitrogen dioxide is a foul-smelling gas. It comes primarily from the burning of fossil fuels — coal, oil and gas. NO2 combines with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sunlight and heat to create ozone. (VOCs are compounds with carbon that easily become vapors or gases.)

In 2010, EPA established a new one-hour NO2 standard of 100 parts per billion.
An area is in compliance if the design value is at or below the standard.
The form to determine design value requires three years of data — the average NO2 concentrations
from each hour. The department and EPA calculate the design value, using the 98th percentile
of one-hour daily maximum concentrations, averaged over three years.

Weekly summary of preliminary data from all NO2 monitoring sites

Preliminary up-to-date one-hour NO2 averages from Blue Ridge, I-70
• Data in fourth column on first page. Each day has three pages of data.
• Data from past 10 days through current date
• Central Standard Time

Preliminary up-to-date data from all NO2 sites
• Data from past three days through current date
• Central Standard Time

Graph of NO2 Design Values, beginning in 2003

*Technical issues can affect ability to deliver quality data.
Click to access a table of symbols indicating issues.